The University of Arizona

Noble gases in chondrules and associated metal-sulfide-rich samples: Clues on chondrule formation and the behavior of noble gas carrier phases

N. VOGEL, I. LEYA, A. BISCHOFF, H. BAUR, R. WIELER

Abstract


Chondrules are generally believed to have lost most or all of their trapped noble gases during their formation. We tested this assumption by measuring He, Ne, and Ar in chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrites Allende (CV3), Leoville (CV3), Renazzo (CR2), and the ordinary chondrites Semarkona (LL3.0), Bishunpur (LL3.1), and Krymka (LL3.1). Additionally, metalsulfide- rich chondrule coatings were measured that probably formed from chondrule metal. Low primordial 20Ne concentrations are present in some chondrules, while even most of them contain small amounts of primordial 36Ar. Our preferred interpretation is thatin contrast to CAIsthe heating of the chondrule precursor during chondrule formation was not intense enough to expel primordial noble gases quantitatively. Those chondrules containing both primordial 20Ne and 36Ar show low presolar-diamond-like 36Ar/20Ne ratios. In contrast, the metal-sulfide-rich coatings generally show higher gas concentrations and Q-like 36Ar/20Ne ratios. We propose that during metalsilicate fractionation in the course of chondrule formation, the Ar-carrying phase Q became enriched in the metal-sulfide-rich chondrule coatings. In the silicate chondrule interior, only the most stable Ne-carrying presolar diamonds survived the melting event leading to the low observed 36Ar/20Ne ratios. The chondrules studied here do not show evidence for substantial amounts of fractionated solar-type noble gases from a strong solar wind irradiation of the chondrule precursor material as postulated by others for the chondrules of an enstatite chondrite.

Keywords


Diogenites;Noble gases;CV3 Chondrites

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