The University of Arizona

Economics of redberry juniper control in the Texas Rolling Plains.

P. Johnson, A. Gerbolini, D. Ethridge, C. Britton, D. Ueckert

Abstract


Redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii Sudw.) is a common invasive brush species that reduces rangeland productivity over vast acreages in the Rolling Plains and Edwards Plateau regions of Texas. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the economic feasibility of redberry juniper control and determine the optimum treatment cycle for maintenance burning. A response equation was used to estimate the relationship between herbage production and redberry juniper canopy. Data to estimate the relationship was obtained for a site in the Texas Rolling Plains. The analysis used chaining as the initial treatment and periodic prescribed burns as maintenance treatments. Additional livestock production resulting from brush treatments and the costs of treatments were estimated and used to calculate net present values of the investment in brush control over a 30-year time horizon. Net present values indicated that juniper control was economically feasible across a wide range of economic and environmental conditions. Prescribed burn intervals were found to be optimal at 7-year intervals under most conditions.

Keywords


chaining;timing;Juniperus pinchotii;costs and returns;cost benefit analysis;brush control;prescribed burning;profitability;biomass production;Texas;canopy;forage

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